Social Success: Five Remarks on Champagne

It has been decided that the consumption of champagne merits at least some small degree of attention. The following small hints are thus offered to Victorian readers with the hope that they might find them to be of interest, and perhaps of use.

  1. Champagne may be served in glasses that are either tall and thin, or wide and shallow.[1]
  2. If one wishes to test the quality of champagne, it should be left it to stand until the gas has abated. The wine can then be tasted.[2]
  3. A meal is normally opened with red wines, while champagne is served later.[3]
  4. At a ball, a lady should limit herself to one glass of wine.[4]
  5. And a gentleman should restrict himself to two.[5]

 

References

Anon., Family Etiquette: A Complete Guide to Conversation, Parties, Travel and the Toilette with Hints on Domestic Affairs, (London: Ward, Lock and Tyler, 1876).

Anon., Routledge’s Manual of Etiquette, (London and New York: George Routledge and Sons, 1875).

Anon., The Habits of Good Society: A Handbook of Etiquette for Ladies and Gentlemen, (London: James Hogg and Sons, 1859).

Anon., The Perfect Gentleman, (New York: Dick & Fitzgerald, 1860).

Footnotes

[1] Anon., Routledge’s Manual of Etiquette, (London and New York: George Routledge and Sons, 1875), p. 25.

[2] Anon., The Perfect Gentleman, (New York: Dick & Fitzgerald, 1860), p. 191.

[3] Anon., Family Etiquette: A Complete Guide to Conversation, Parties, Travel and the Toilette with Hints on Domestic Affairs, (London: Ward, Lock and Tyler, 1876), p. 33.

[4] Anon., The Habits of Good Society: A Handbook of Etiquette for Ladies and Gentlemen, (London: James Hogg and Sons, 1859), p. 338.

[5] Ibid.

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