Social Success: Five Hints on Victorian Household Management (Part Three)

In the management of any respectable Victorian household, neatness, tidiness, good taste and economy all have their place. However, a home should not just be a warm place to sit by the fire, but a place which warms the heart as well.

While that might perhaps sound a little too quaint, and while some might even whisper conspiratorially that gentlemen ought to make a contribution to the running of the house as well, the achievement of domestic bliss is something to which we do seem to expect ladies to aspire in the present age. Naturally, Behind The Past feels that it is up to each lady individually to determine her own aspirations and what will best add to her own happiness. However, for any ladies who do desire to make perfect domestic, marital happiness their goal, Behind The Past is pleased to present the following modest hints and tips to them:

  1. A lady should seek to cultivate a cheerful and patient disposition.[1]
  2. A lady should make a point of looking at her wedding band, and reminding herself of the solemn vows she made.[2]
  3. A lady should also never lead her husband to believe that she displays better conduct and dress when in general company, than when she is solely in his company.[3]
  4. A lady should also endeavour to make her home welcoming and comfortable for her husband, and she should not neglect her duties with respect to the upkeep and maintenance of his wardrobe.[4]
  5. A lady should not display an improper or excessive degree of fondness towards her husband in public.[5]

 

 

Footnotes

[1] Anon., All About Etiquette; Or, The Manners of Polite Society: For Ladies, Gentlemen and Families, (London: Ward, Lock, And Co., 1875[?]), p. 358.

[2] Anon., Etiquette, Social Ethics, and the Courtesies of Society, (London: Wm. S. Orr & Co., 1854), 35.

[3] Ibid., p. 36.

[4] Anon., The Etiquette of Love, Courtship and Marriage, To which is Added the Etiquette of Politeness, (Halifax: Milner And Sowerby, 1859), pp. 121-122.

[5] Ibid., p. 122.

 

 

Bibliography

Anon., All About Etiquette; Or, The Manners of Polite Society: For Ladies, Gentlemen and Families, (London: Ward, Lock, And Co., 1875[?]).

Anon., Etiquette, Social Ethics, and the Courtesies of Society, (London: Wm. S. Orr & Co., 1854).

Anon., The Etiquette of Love, Courtship and Marriage, To which is Added the Etiquette of Politeness, (Halifax: Milner And Sowerby, 1859).

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